Saturday, December 31, 2005

10 DAYS PROTEST TO STOP THE GENOCIDE IN DARFUR


400, 000 Killed
2.5 million Displaced
10 Days Protest

Stop the genocide in Darfur

January 1-10, 2006, Outside the Embassy of Sudan



10 Days of Protest: A New Year’s Resolution for Darfur

From Sunday, January 1 – Tuesday, January 10, student groups, activist organizations, religious congregations and concerned individuals from Washington D.C. and all over the country will protest outside the Sudanese Embassy against the government-backed genocide in Sudan’s Darfur region.

WHY?
The Sudanese Embassy claims on its website that “Darfur wasn’t Genocide,”
BUT the violence in Darfur—responsible for 400,000 deaths, millions of displaced peoples, murder, rape and the destruction of 90% of the villages in Darfur—has been declared genocide by President Bush, Colin Powell, a unanimous House of Representative, and the National Holocaust Memorial Museum.

The Sudanese Embassy asserts “No evidence Sudan’s government involved in Darfur raid,”
BUT the weaponry and aerial equipment of the Janjaweed are those of Khartoum, and all evidence indicates that government officials are directly supporting these militias. While the Sudanese Government denies responsibility, it refuses to prosecute the 51 suspects named by the UN for war crimes in Darfur and awaiting trial in the International Criminal Court.

The Sudanese Embassy declares Sudan’s “optimistic future,”
BUT North/South peace talks are being constantly postponed because of Janjaweed violence. Due to the violence, humanitarian aid threatens to leave, an action that would lead to a certain death for Darfurians. Moreover, the likely occurrence of Sudanese President Omar al-Bashir becoming President of the African Union would transform Darfur’s last line of defense into an extension of Khartoum. The “optimistic future” includes the eradication of an entire population for Khartoum’s economic and political benefit.

Amidst this catastrophic scenario, the United States has become a complicit observer—and by extension, so has the American public. After Rwanda, George W. Bush infamously declared: “not on my watch.” Now, over a year after his government declared the situation in Darfur to be “genocide,” Bush and his administration have taken no real action for fear of upsetting the Sudanese government. Meanwhile, American newspapers and television have covered the crisis minimally or not at all, failing in their fundamental responsibility to educate the public.

Starting on New Year’s Day, we will stand outside the embassy for 4 hours each day from 11 am to 3 pm. For 10 days, we will pressure our politicians to take an aggressive stand against genocide. We will generate the kind of press that this crisis warrants, exposing the horrors that American media has cruelly neglected.

We demand:
· An end to Khartoum's support of the Janjaweed militias
· An expansion of the African Union mandate to protect civilians, and the involvement of UN or NATO multinational peace-keeping forces on the ground.
· Prosecution of Sudanese human rights violators in the International Criminal Court.

As many people as possible should be here each day; however, it is most important that the effort is sustained rather than large. A calendar is posted online to allow each group and individual to mark times of presence. Go to
www.calendar.yahoo.com. Username: Darfurprotest, Password: Darfur. Go to monthly calendar and click "add" on the dates you wish to participate. It will also allow you to specify hours. Please include a contact email address.

Compelling visuals will be provided, but any other images or information are encouraged. Wear your warmest green clothing! Remember, the goal of the project is gain media attention—the more people, the more organizations, the more buzz we can create!

The Embassy of the Republic of the Sudan is located at 2210 Massachusetts Ave. NW, in Washington, DC. Please join us in protest.
Phone: Sarah Reed, 610.283.1149
Email:
sreed@wesleyan.edu, akoch@wesleyan.edu and jboddum@wesleyan.edu for more information.

15 comments:

kyels said...

I just wish the Janjaweed militias would stop the violence and stop hurting the innocent lives of Darfurians... I really wish this genocide would stop and not repeat what had happened in Rwanda in 1994.

All the best to the New Year's Resolution for Darfur.

Orikinla Osinachi. said...

Thanks Kyels,
The Sudanese Government can disarm and disband the Janjaweed militias, because they are mercenaries employed by the government of Sudan to crush the rebels.

Kyels said...

But why do they want to crush the rebels? And what has the rebels got to do with those innocent people in Darfur?

Toniyah Tonijah said...

Kyels,
Most of the rebels are from Darfur and the rebels are fighting for the rights of their people and defending them against the Arabs ruling Sudan and the Arab Janjaweed mercenaries.

kyels said...

Hi Toniyah,

But I don't really see that there is anything wrong with the rebels as they are fighting for their rights over there. And the Government shouldn't impose those militias to actually crush the rebels and when they do hundreds of thousands of people are killed. Why can't they just sit down together and discuss it in peace?

Orikinla Osinachi. said...

Kyels,
That is what we have been trying to do with all the combatants in our state capital Abuja in Nigeria.

You can contact the Spokesman of the African Union for Darfur Mr. Assane Ba : Contact Tel in Abuja:+234 803 626 97

To put in a word of advice across.
The more they know that we are all concerned the better.

God bless.

kyels said...

But some Sudanese do speak Arabic right? And they are not Arabs. However, it seems to me the the people on the Northern Sudan doesn't really know much about what's going on in Darfur except for the people in the Government or those who really care..

Orikinla Osinachi. said...

The people in Sudan know everything going on in Darfur.
One in every five Sudanese people come from Northern Nigeria.

kyels said...

Orikinla,

But why do people in the Northern Sudan are segregated with the people in the South. They are afterall, called Sudanese. And why the people in Khartoum speak in Arabic?

Toniyah Tonijah said...

Kye,
I will have to find out more to give you the correct answers.

Well done.

Victim no Longer! said...

The days when the victors of conflict could write the history books to suit themselves is gone,thanks to wonderful world citizens such as your self.
I had to see who would use the acronym NGO.Of course,someone in Government work!
I am emailing as suggested to see what small part I might make.Perhaps my THE VIEW FROM OUTSIDE should branch out to include international Justice issues.
I have been at both your sites today,and I again congratulate you on your wonderful work.
p.s.I am also FREE AT LAST

Toniyah said...

One day, the oppressed in Darfur will no longer be victims.

God bless.

kyels said...

Hey Toni,

Thanks! :)

kyels said...

I believe that Darfur will be free from all these sad tragedies to. May peace prevail soon and save the innocent people. :)

Toniyah Tonijah said...

Kyels,
As can be seen, you have shown more compassion for the victims of war in Darfur than all the other visitors.

God bless you always.